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Featured Artists

Alban Beikircher: violin
Benedikt Koehlen: piano

SCHUMANN: Violin Sonata No. 1 in A minor, Op. 105 • Violin Sonata No. 2 in D minor, Op. 121 • Violin Sonata No. 3 in A minor, Op. posth.

Arte Nova

Benedikt Koehlen was born in Speyer and received his training as a pianist with Elisabeth Moritz Conrad, Richard Laugs, Friedrich Wührer, and Geza Anda. He also studied conducting with Karl Mennerich, Kurt Eichhorn, and Jan Koetsier. He was awarded numerous distinctions in international competitions, like the Van Cliburn Competition and the Ferruccio Busoni Competition. Extensive concert appearances led to his appearance on international platforms from the very start of his career. His 1968 debut in Munich provoked enthusiastic reviews. He appeared repeatedly at major festivals, and as a soloist with orchestras and conductors of repute. A high point of the last season was Koehlen’s performance of both volumes of Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier on the 250th anniversary of Bach’s death, during the Bach Night at the Munich Culture Centre am Gasteig. His first co-production (Karl Amadeus Hartmann/Leoš Janácek) reached the final list for the German Record Critics’ Prize. Further releases of works by Stravinsky, Antheil, Satie, Artur Schnabel, and Hindemith (complete violin sonatas, with Ulf Hoelscher) followed. During his career to date, Koehlen has maintained longstanding chamber music partnerships with soloists like Ulf Hoelscher, Christoph Henkel, and Michael Schopper. Since the foundation of the Balance Trio in 1996, his activities in this area have seen further expansion.

Featured Artists

Matthias Kirschnereit: piano


BRAHMS: Piano Sonata in F-sharp minor, Op. 2 • 16 Waltzes, Op. 39 • Scherzo in E-flat minor, Op. 4

Arte Nova

Born in Dorsten/Westphalia in 1962, Matthias Kirschnereit spent the formative years of his youth in Namibia and later studied at the Detmold Music Academy with Professor Kretschmar-Fischer. His work with Claudio Arrau, Bruno Leonardo Gelber, Oleg Maisenberg, and Murray Perahia also contributed to his artistic development. His great successes at the German Music Competition in Bonn, the International Concours Geza Anda in Zurich, and the Australian International Piano Competition in Sydney marked the beginning of his international concert career, which has taken him to all five continents. He regularly appears in all important European concert houses, and is engaged as a soloist by prestigious orchestras including the Camerata Academica Salzburg, Lucerne Festival String Orchestra, I Musici di Montreal, the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra, Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra, Sinfonia Varsovia, Beethoven Academie Antwerpen, and Kölner Kammerorchester. Kirschnereit has been professor at the newly-founded Academy of Music and Theatre in Rostock since 1997, and lives in Hamburg.


Featured Artists

Radek Baborak: French horn
Bavarian Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra
Johannes Moesus: conductor

ROSETTI: Concertos (4) for horn & orchestra in E & E-flat


Arte Nova

Even though the more than 400 pieces that Rosetti wrote are characterized by imaginative instrumentation, original melody, and structural coherence—and although his slower movements already show the emotional world of the Romantic period—his music was practically forgotten after 1800. However, the guild of horn players has never quite forgotten about Rosetti’s concerts for horn. Fourteen out of seventeen concerts for horn still exist, and of seven concerts for two horns, six remain.


Featured Artists

Hartmut Rohde: viola
Lithuanian Chamber Orchestra Vilnius
Georg Mais: conductor

J.C. BACH: Viola Concerto in C minor • HOFFMEISTER: Viola Concerto in D • TELEMANN: Viola Concerto in G • HINDEMITH: Trauermusik

Arte Nova

During recent years the solo concert repertory for viola has been extended by several works. One example is the Viola Concerto in C, the reconstruction of a harpsichord concerto by Johann Sebastian Bach. Other compositions, such as those by Ignace Joseph Pleyel or Antonio Rosetti, have been published for the first time. They are all welcome additions to this classical genre, one of whose most ingenious works is surely Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante in E flat major. Two further classical works are the Concertos in D major by Carl Stamitz (Op. 1) and Franz Anton Hoffmeister (1754–1812). The latter was known and respected in his time not only as a composer, but also as a publisher. Both works are the most common audition pieces for viola players to this day.


Featured Artists

Zoran Todorovich: tenor
Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra Bratislava
Ivan Anguélov: conductor

14 arias from Werther, Roméo et Juliette, Les pêcheurs de perles, La favorita, Rigoletto, Il corsaro, L’Arlésienne, Zazà, La bohème (Leoncavallo), La bohème (Puccini), Lodoletta & Tosca

Arte Nova

Successful debuts as Pinkerton in Madama Butterfly at the Vienna State Opera, as Alfredo in La Traviata at the Hamburg State Opera, and as the Duke in Rigoletto at the Teatro della Maestranza in Seville during the season of 1996/97 swiftly paved the way for Zoran Todorovich’s remarkable international career. Since then he has been a regular guest in roles such as Edgardo, Alfredo, Pinkerton, Faust (both Gounod and Berlioz), or Lenski at the Vienna State Opera, the Deutsche Oper, and Staatsoper Unter den Linden in Berlin, the Zurich Opera, the Hamburg State Opera, the Bayerische Staatsoper München, the opera houses in Leipzig and Frankfurt, the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, the New National Theatre Tokyo, and at many festivals. Todorovich< achieved spectacular success as Rudolfo in La bohème in his American debut at the San Francisco Opera during the season 1999/2000.


Featured Artists

Emil Klein: cello
Cristian Beldi: piano

MENDELSSOHN: Cello Sonata No. 1 in B-flat, Op. 45 • Cello Sonata No. 2 in D, Op. 58 • “Lied ohne Worte” Op. 109

Arte Nova

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809–1847) wrote relatively little chamber music. The composer Carl Friedrich Zelter (1758–1832) wrote of his pupil Mendelssohn in a letter to Goethe: “He plays the piano like a devil and there is no holding him back on stringed instruments.” The experience in these instrumental areas is set off especially in the Sonatas for Cello and Piano B major Op. 45 and D major Op. 58. The cantabile violoncello writing is combined with an agile, flowing, and most brilliant piano part. In 1845 a further piece for violoncello and piano followed these two sonatas: the “Lied ohne Worte” (“Song without words”) D major Op. 109. The genesis of this work—as in the case of the Sonatas Op. 45 and Op. 58—leaves many questions unanswered, since it was published from his effects after the composer’s death.


Featured Artists

Orquesta Filarmónica de Gran Canaria
Adrian Leaper: conductor

MAHLER: Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp minor

Arte Nova

In 1878, Gustav Mahler (1860–1911) successfully finished his studies at the Vienna Conservatory. After his first compositions did not meet the foreseen success, he decided to become a conductor and as such conducted at various theatres such as Olmütz, Kassel, Prague, Budapest, and Hamburg. In 1897, he was nominated director of the Royal Opera of Vienna. The opera house being closed during the summer months, he took advantage of this interlude by composing. In the summer of 1901, the first three movements of his Fifth Symphony were completed, followed in 1902 by the two last ones. In autumn 1901, Mahler met Alma Schindler and offered her, in place of his declaration of love, the fourth movement of his Fifth Symphony (Visconti used this music for his film Death In Venice, based on a novel by Thomas Mann). Alma Schindler, being a composer herself, had no difficulty understanding its secret message. Their engagement took place in December 1901, and their marriage in the following summer.

Featured Artists

René Clemencic: clavicytherium


JOHANNES VON LUBLIN: Tabulatura 1540 (including motets by Senfl, Brumel, Isaac, Josquin, and anonymous composers; songs by Martin Wolff, Georg Brack, Thomas Stoltzer, Phllippe Verdelot, Sebastian Festa, Pierre Sandrin & Josquin)

Arte Nova

The clavicytherium is a harpsichord with an upright case. Because it saved space, and because the sound issued directly into the room, it enjoyed a wide popularity until the late 18th century. It was first mentioned by Paulus Paulirinus of Prague in a treatise circa 1460, and the first drawing of the instrument can be found in a fresco in the Pfarrkirche St. Leonhard in Dornbach (Kärnten, Austria). Like all early keyboard instruments, the clavicytherium was not only an aesthetical-musical sound-producer, but also a cosmological instrumentum—a manifestation of harmonious world< numerology in sound. For the then-receding Middle Ages and the emerging Renaissance, the world’s inner essence—according to Pythagorean theory combined with a cabalistic understanding of the Bible—consisted of numbers and proportions: “But Thou hast ordered all things in measure and number and weight” (The Wisdom of Solomon 11:20).

Featured Artists

Ricardo Castro: piano
Schmidt-Gertenbach
Sinfonia Varsovia

Complete Nocturnes • Piano Concertos 1 & 2 • Sonata No. 2, Op. 35 • Sonata No. 3, Op. 58 • Valse Op. 64

Arte Nova

Ricardo Castro was born in Brazil in 1964. He studied with Esther Cardoso in Salvador de Bahla and had his first official piano performance at the age of eight. He moved to Europe in 1984, studying with Maria Tipo at the Geneva Conservatory and then working with various piano virtuosos, such as Dominique Merlet in Paris. He has been awarded numerous prizes, among them first prize at the International Piano Competition in Leeds in 1993. His concerts throughout Europe lead him frequently to Vienna, Hamburg, Geneva, Zurich, Munich, and London. He has performed with the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra in Japan and with Simon Rattle, as well as with the English Chamber Orchestra and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra in England.


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